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Coronavirus Travel Restrictions – Should I Stay or Should I Go?

The Coronavirus (aka COVID-19) and the coronavirus travel restrictions are causing havoc worldwide. At first we worried that the disease might spread from China. But now we need to consider how the shutdown of Chinese factories and spread of the disease to and within different countries around the world will affect our daily lives.

If you’ll be traveling overseas soon, you’ll have a tough decision to make: should you go?

I recently had this discussion with a client of mine who was set to leave for Italy in two weeks. She said, “You travel overseas like I do. We don’t let terrorists stop us. We don’t let malaria stop us. We shouldn’t let this get in our way either.”

What if you’re relatively young and healthy? Currently, the Coronavirus is apparently no worse than a bad case of the flu. Unless you’re elderly or have a weakened immune system, this virus shouldn’t be deadly to you. You’re strong. You won’t get it, right? Or even if you do, you’ll only be down and out for a few days.

But there’s more to think about than just getting sick.

It will most likely be a financial loss if you don’t go on your trip since the majority of travel insurance policies do not cover cancellations related to an epidemic. So shouldn’t you move forward with your travel so you don’t lose money?

Not to sound like a broken record, but there’s more to think about.

What if you are suddenly affected by coronavirus travel restrictions?

What if you get quarantined at your destination (or somewhere along your journey) outside of the U.S.?

Who will pay for your stay?

If travel insurance doesn’t cover expenses related to an epidemic or delays or cancellations due to coronavirus travel restrictions, who will pay for change fees to rearrange your altered flight home?

If you get sick over there, who will pay for your care?

What kind of care will you receive?

Will you lose pay from work?

Will you have to use vacation days?

If you left your children or pets at home, who will take care of them if you’re quarantined?

If you’re taking a vacation from being a caregiver, who will care for that person for an extra few weeks?

What if you are quarantined here? Or what if your school or place of employment requires you to self-quarantine at home upon your return from an international trip?

Who will pay for your stay if it’s not at your home?

If travel insurance doesn’t cover expenses related to an epidemic, who will pay for your change in travel to reach your home?

If you get sick stateside, will your health insurance cover you?

Will you lose pay from work?

Will you have to use vacation days?

If you left your children or pets at home, who will take care of them if you’re quarantined elsewhere?

If you’re taking a vacation from being a caregiver, who will care for that person for an extra few weeks?

In the end, she decided not to take a chance on getting quarantined since Italy started implementing travel restrictions on the day we spoke. My husband and I will be going through this same questioning and discussion process when we decide whether or not to go through with our planned research trip to Italy this summer.

If you have an upcoming trip outside of the United States, all of these are important questions to consider, even if Coronavirus travel restrictions have not yet been placed in or near your destination.

For medical, scientific and travel updates to help you with your decision, visit the Coronavirus Updates page I set up.

It is definitely not an enviable situation to be in to have to even think about all of this. But I’d rather have the option of making this type of decision before leaving than be caught by surprise like those first tourists who got trapped in the unexpected mess of coronavirus travel restrictions.

Let’s hope this Coronavirus situation comes to an end – soon!

About Helene Segura, M.A. Ed., CPO®

As The Inefficiency Assassin™, Time Management Fixer Helene Segura empowers professionals on the go with the tools to slay lost time. Personal inefficiency at work leads to increased stress levels, lower morale, higher absenteeism, more turnover – and rising spending on employee health care and hiring. Why not improve productivity, decrease stress levels, and increase profits instead? The author of four books – two of which were Amazon best-sellers – Helene Segura has been the featured organization expert in more than 200 media interviews. She has coached hundreds of clients to productivity success and performance improvement by applying neuroscience and behavioral modification techniques to wipe out destructive, time-wasting habits. Helene turns time management on its head by sharing both client case studies and pop culture examples to teach her mind-bending framework for decreasing interruptions, distractions and procrastination so that companies can spend more time generating revenue.

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