Review of Varidesk Height Adjustable Standing Desk

Three months ago, I shared advice about how to choose a height adjustable standing desk. I compiled all of that information because not only was I being frequently asked about which standing desk is best, but I’d also decided to make the leap and purchase one.

I spent a couple of hours researching reviews and comparing desk characteristics. This is after I’ve observed many standing desks (both adjustable and non-adjustable) in action in various offices. I knew I would purchase an adjustable desk because I didn’t want to have to clear off a stationary standing desk and re-set up my station just to be able to sit down. You can read the criteria that I came up with in my original post about how to choose a height adjustable standing desk. I narrowed it down to three choices. And then I removed the prices. I wanted to see what choice I would make if budget wasn’t a factor.

All of my criteria that I developed for comparisons were pretty much the same with these three, but there were slight differences in:

*whether or not the desk arrived assembled or disassembled

*how deep the desk was

*how much weight the desk can hold

*comments about the ease of lifting the desk into a higher position

I’m pretty handy, but I’d rather use my time to build up business and not build a desk, so I chose the one that came pre-assembled. I tend to lean when I stand, so I chose the desk that held more weight. I also don’t want to get frustrated while I’m working, so I chose the one that had slightly more “ease of Review of Varidesk Height Adjustable Standing Desk

that was actually 1” too deep for my desk, so I knew I would have to move my desk away from the wall.

And the winner was: Varidesk Pro Plus 36 for $395

This desk was $100 over my budget, but I figured $100 now would save me more than that in time, frustration and purchasing a different “better” desk later if I went with my second or third pick, so I took the plunge. Because this adjustable desk cost more than what I paid for my “actual” desk 12 years ago, I expected nothing but the best from VariDesk. (Read: I’m going to be darn picky!)

Here’s what I learned about purchasing a height adjustable standing desk:

*I am so glad I chose one that came pre-assembled. I looked at the screws and spring system. I would’ve spent a long time lining everything up perfectly and then squeezing my hands in between parts to screw things in.

*If you buy a solid desk, you’ll need help carrying it. Even if you’re Mr. Strongman or Ms. Strongwoman, a solid desk will be heavy and awkward when you’re trying to lift it up onto your desk and get it into position without scratching the furniture.

*It takes time to get used to the new positioning of your desk supplies. I purchased a two-level desk, so now my belongings were on two different levels instead of flat. It took about a week for me to get things where they were totally functional for me.

*Switching positions is best for the body. Standing up all day is bad for you. Sitting down all day is bad for you. Alternate between the two positions throughout the day and take walking breaks as well. I switch off roughly every 60-90 minutes. This is why a well-made, easy-to-adjust desk is so critical.

*Leaners need a desk that can hold weight. My desk has a max weight load of 35 pounds, which is one of the heavier weight loads that I found. Obviously, I weigh more than that, but I’m not going to sit on my desk. I’m going to lean against it. I’ve caught myself leaning on my desk so much that I felt an extremely slight “give”. My adjustable desk has a solid base, so it won’t tip over. The issue will be with the eventual overload of the springs because that’s what I’m actually pushing against. I need to watch that. You do, too, if you’re a leaner.

*Going wireless makes switching positions much easier. I do end up moving my keyboard and mouse to a different level when I switch from sitting to standing and vice versa. I’ve been using the same wired mouse (I love this thing!) for about 10 years, and I didn’t want to change. I wouldn’t say it’s a pain, but it would certainly save a couple of seconds if I went wireless. (My keyboard is, and that’s a snap.)

Overall, I’m very happy with my purchase. As a cheapskate, it initially pained me to fork out those dollars, but I’ve been very happy with my height adjustable standing desk over these last three months.

By the way, no matter which desk you choose, block off a couple of hours to purge your old desk and arrange your new one. I can’t tell you how many clients I’ve worked with who said, “I just put that there when I started my job.” They never cleared out their predecessor’s desk and took the time to set up their new work space. That’s part of the reason they feel out of sorts and disorganized – because they never actually started fresh. This is your chance to start “fresh” with your new standing desk.

About Helene Segura

As The Inefficiency Assassin™, Time Management Fixer Helene Segura empowers professionals on the go with the tools to slay lost time. Personal inefficiency at work leads to increased stress levels, lower morale, higher absenteeism, more turnover – and rising spending on employee health care and hiring. Why not improve productivity, decrease stress levels, and increase profits instead? The author of four books – two of which were Amazon best-sellers – Helene Segura has been the featured organization expert in more than 200 media interviews including publications such as Woman’s Day Magazine and Money Magazine, as well as on Fox, CBS, ABC and NBC affiliates. She has coached hundreds of clients to productivity success and performance improvement by applying neuroscience and behavioral modification techniques to wipe out destructive, time-wasting habits. Kanban, Kaizen and time management may be fuddy duddy terms; Helene’s content-packed keynotes and workshops, however, are anything but. Helene turns time management on its head by sharing both client case studies and pop culture examples to teach her mind-bending framework for decreasing interruptions, distractions and procrastination so that companies can spend more time generating revenue.

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